Notice: Undefined index: HTTP_REFERER in /home/stparch/public_html/headmid_temp_main.php on line 4389
Newspaper Archive of
Golden Valley News
Beach, North Dakota
October 7, 1943     Golden Valley News
PAGE 3     (3 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Jumbo Image    Save To Scrapbook    Set Notifiers    PDF    JPG
 
PAGE 3     (3 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Jumbo Image    Save To Scrapbook    Set Notifiers    PDF    JPG
October 7, 1943
 
Newspaper Archive of Golden Valley News produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2024. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information
Terms Of Use | Privacy Policy | Request Content Removal | About / FAQ | Get Acrobat Reader




October 7, 1943 OLAALLEY NEWS THE G PAGE THRE~ THE Published Every Thursday by The PUBLISHING CO., A. Shl~an, Editor ] I ~d Class matter at~ at Beach, North 7, 1936, under the March 3, 1897. CASUALTIES of all the United and the mer- on Septem- during the 21 Harbor, 103,932 in action, wound- or taken do not in- accidents and of course do casualties in months that was in the First total of casualties classifications, with- I IThe Japs kicked him in the face and stomach, smashed him withtheir fists, l~ifed him, jabbed him with a pitchfork and left him for dead, but Pvt. E. O. Moore came through this orde_aL bIow yott come tb.rough, y '~est--Buy more War Bond~. marine and ex-lmunized monkeys. There may be taken prisoner, was lseveral types of the virus, as in allowance is made for lthe case of pneumonia. The next in the "current cas-[step is to discover the types and 38,895 men are listed as obtain an agent that attacks them 23,804 are listed as all successfully of war, the difference The scientists are on the job emphasized. It is against this dread disease Their many who are listed painstaking research will uncover will be reported as pris- some miracle drug like sulfanili- will turn up in areas mide or penicillin. Sometimes a by the enemy, generation passes before even a the difference is cer- partial victory is scored against to the great success of a disease. Progress in the fight medical groups in all against cancer, for example, is very the service. They have slow. But in the polio fight, set- the death rate from ence is creating a foundation from an undetermined extent, which to operate. Victory may account for the fact come swiftly men have been ---V. while in the nine- NATURE CHANGES TIME of the First World battle deaths---killed in The turning back and forth of died of wounds received national clocks, with time pieces 50,510. tuned to working and waking differences in the condi- hours, might have confused us a ~Ombat and transportation number of times in different places. in tvlo wars can be examined But nature has her way of manag- With in the way of deduc- ing the day and night of our work- tions show that the casualty a-day lives and as the sun moves in this war will be less from the north to the south, she than in American war, This reminds us by shadows the days Will the morale of the are shorter and nights longer COmbat forces a~d will be especially encouraging to ci~lians whose lov-natureMan canis dOno nothingclock watcher.abut it Wefr ed ones are in the ',heaters of war. have heard from boys overseas of Any price in deat~ or disability their surprise in the decided fall is beyond appraisal '~y~ individual of night in the tropical countries. instances, but in the a~gregate the They write of how they miss the result testifies to the deb~rmination twilight, the dusk, back home of all Ame1:ican militar~ leaders This is perhaps one of the many to win the war with the leilst pus- things we have taken for granted, sible cost in men. " this spell of twilight. As it steals --V , quietly across our path, as afternoon IF IT 1M(UST BE ( fades into soft dusk, we think of " more in the light of hour than There continues he criticism in itto the pleasing closing of each regard to drafting the fathers By day We do not think of it, but January our government expects accept it placidly until someone, to draft about 446,000 men from like our soldier, tells home of how 18 to 37 who were fathers before he m~vses their twilight. We don't the Pearl Harbor incident. There stop to consider the music of the have been a number of others season, Lhe sounds that nature taken already who were in the offers Thd sunrise is lost because Post-Pearl Harbor grouping. There we sleep late. The chirp of morn- have been many fathers who have ing. bird calls .,when dew dazzles Volunteered long before the father's the grass and ~ sky lightens draft issue arose. Still comes the as day breaks, is lost because the roar, but amidst the wailing, look clock has not pointed as yet to around you and see from whencb action. The change of time, of it comes. From those men who man's moving those hands an hour are now called upon to leave? this or that way is not the tempo l No, it comes prh~paliy from poll- of living. It is nature's way of: ticians and folks who speak anti changing the clock that is appeal- of all war policies and hardships, ing and impresses us, that is re- No one wants fathers to be drafted, membered by boys in fox holes in: No one is desiring the breaking the Solomons, who hail from Keno- up of homes, of lining up sons and sho, Terre Haute, Ann Arbor and fathers under shell fire But we Beach. have a war to fight and we are ---V.-- not at the goal pests as yet. We VICTORY GARDENS have taken many men and since } we continue to battle we must Twenty million Victory gardenerst take more, so our military judges are harvesting or have harvestedI tell tt~. Who should know how crops worth a billion dollars, ac-[ many men are necessary to carry cording to estimates of the United] on successfully, the complainer States Department of Agriculture! or the men versed in military hum- and Stanford University. These l hers? So as hateful as it is, totals surprised the government if it is necessary to draft fathers, officials who urged public devo- then the fathers will go. They tion to gardening. The response Will ~ell you that if they aren't surpassed their most optimistic taken our country is "taking a expectations. ehan~- on winning the war. SeVeral curious results of the Rather than take a chance on gardening drive have been noted. l~lng the war by reducing our In some cities the experts made armed force, they would rather go, surveys and advise,,? against plant- if only Just for the sake of their ing in certain 'blighted" areas. Children. rl2w~e are American Vegetables would not grow there, fathers who aren't playing politics it was owlishly stated. But the or bide and seek, but playing a town farmer, with a born distrust nlore deadly game, and they are of experts rivaling that of his going to win! rural contemporary, went ahead V-- with his spading, raking and WINNING FOLIO FIGHT seeding. Results have been amaz- ing. Production was tremendous Each successive epidemic of in- on lots that formerly were dump- fa~tile paralysis results in gains ing places for ashes and tin cans. 1~ scored in the field of know- Keen rivalry developed among of how to meet` and conquer states and regions. Los Angeles the malady. Many former con- claimed to be the Victory Garden clttsions have been proved false, spot of the world, with natives de- It is definitely known now that claring their corn to be taller than the virus of poliomyelitis does not Iowa's. Many other areas brand attack by way of the nose alone these Los Angeles claims as court- but by the mouth and alimentary terfeit. tract as well. Flies and probably Tentative surveys indicate that house mice are found to be nearly all of this year's gardeners carriers, will continue next year and will Dr. Claud Jungeblut and Marry be joined by thousands of others. Sanders have pa~ed strains of the ~ advice is to start that 1944 POliomyelit~ virus through hun- Victory Gard0n now. Breaking dreds of nil~e and from the mice ground this fall for mpring plant- they obta~ vaccine which ira- lag will a~ure much greater yields. George Beach from Esmond, North Dakota with the idea of locating and en- gaging in business. Mr. McClellan did locate and served as United States Commissioner here for many years when homestead filings and final proofs were sufficient to keep him busy. Mr. McCellan is still United States Commissioner and McClellan arrived in lMedora was nominated for sheriff; [for the nomination as state's at- !Karl Olson defeated J E. Arnoldi torney. Taft was nominated as for treasurer; Paul Lebo was high the republican choice for president. man for clerk of court and John ~V Keohane led the field of lawyers Back the Attack With War Rondm i i t t t ,u II STATEMENT O14` SCHOOL TI|EASUIIEIL'S ANNUAL REPOIt'I~ Receipts in General Fund A. Cash 1~ General Funds (in hands of District Treasurer and excluding Sinking Fund) July lepresented this district in the state legislator. J. R. Smith of Beach was 40 years ahead of his time. In 1908 he had invented and put on the market a wheel for automobiles with a puncture proof tire. Smith had great hopes of building up a big industry in Beach but evidently i the new automobile tire didn't I prove to be the success as picturedI for it in the early issues of the1 Beach Advance [ Fresh creamery butter made at the Beach creamery was selling for 25 cents a pound Creameries in North Dakota in the early 1900 period were years ahead of their time. Right now a properly or- 1, 1942 .............................................................................. 1. Total amount received during year froan apportionment of State Tuition Fund .............. $ 74.06 2. Total amount received during year from apportionment of County Tuition Fund .......... , 23.67 5. Amount received during year from Taxes Levied by District School Board ........................ 1027.79 6. Amount received during year from other Hevenue l~eceipts (Total of a, b, e a~d d) ............................................................................. 26.51) Total amount received hy School Treasurer during the Year (Total of items 1 to 9 in- clusive) ......................................................................... (;rand Total amou.t received by School Dis- tri(~t Tre;lsurer including (~ash on hand (Item A and Item B) ............................................................... I~XP|~Ni)IT[~ltES OF GENERAL FUND Aulolln|$ Paid l),,ring Year for the l~'ollowing Purposes: 1. th'n(,ral Control. (School Officers Salaries $43.52) .................................................................... 43.52 2. Instrut.tional Service. (Teachers' Salaries $710.50 Text Books $14.25 Supplies $25.77 Vi,'tory Tax $5.70) ................................................ 756.22 3. Auxiliary AgenCies. (Transportati(m $122.16 Tuition $14G.t;7 } ..................................................... 268.83 4. ()pvration of lqant. (Fuel $65.00 Supplies $2.82) .............................................................................. 67.82 5. Maintenance of Plant. (Repairs to Build- $ 191fi.62 1152.02 $3067.64 And there is not the slightest chance that the produce of Victory Gardens will not be needed again next year. CUTTING THE CIRCLES From the beginning this has been a war of encirclement, with the job of the United Nations to close and contract the circles and ganized farmers cooperative cream- ery, operating a poultry market and having a cold storage locker plant would be the greatest boon the Beach territory could have. Marketing facilities for dairy pro- ducts have made great develop- men~ in the past 25 or 30 years.! June 1~, 19@8 A site had been picked out for a school at Alpha. H C. Jensen received his new Ford runabout. C. F. Hougen reported the arrival of a new son. Charles Foley and Martha Bu- :hanan were married June 4th Beach beat Wibaux at baseball n a game played at Beach with a score of 8 to 6. aim of the axis to break out. ~leat Churchill meant last spring i.An .exCaVoa~ithnsihadofbthn s~:edet by his "end of the beginning' state- ~rom ~ne ~ ~ i-' walk ment was that the Allies at last ~2~;0~ aePd::f abuS~t:r were made had the circles closed From now] ' pc ..... " . by the Beacn creamery during ItS on the task LS shrink the c~rcles ....... That applies to the fighting in 1 firThemBn::Ch APdr:~cn" in its issue Europe and in the Pacific When ........ 1 fille-with the nazis made their thrust into! oi ~tUna~ l~a~ooWfoTet~he ~arious pol't'c I y the Caucasus, they were trying tot ........ break out of the circle. Rommel thennma.~eSvo ~emSandaSasarP~eaCth: in Egypt had hopes of encompass- t e~li_ m~de more enemies than ing the Mediterranean and mak-I puo sner ing an Allied encirclement ira- friends for himself and paper. At possible, least we never knew very many in~s $20.45) ........................................: ........................ 20.45 6. Fixed Charges. (Insurance $66.33 Miscellan- eous $10.00) ................................................................. 70.63 D. Total Amount ['aid Daring School Year by District Treasurer . ....................................................... $123347 E. Cash on hand in General Fund as of June 30, 1943 (Item G, Treas. Report) .................................... $1834,1T STATE OF NOHTH DAKOTA, ) COUNTY OF GOLDEN VALLEY )ss. Henry School District No. 12 ) 1 do solemnly swear tha'~ to the best of my knowledge end belief the withtn is a true and correct report of all moneys received and[ paid out by me as School Treasurer. NATALIE J. ADAMSON Treasurer of Henry School District No. 12. Illlllll lira From where I sit . Every time Lem Martin hears about another Jap battl6ship be- ing sunk-0r another Nazi city being blasted-Lea1 grits his teeth, and digs into his pocket for more War Bond money. "With our soldiers over there doin' better 'n' better at their seorin'," Lem says grimly, "we can do the same at home." From where I sit, here's the way it is... It's up to evcryono of us to put not only our spare money into War Bonds, but to figure out new ways of saving so that we'll have still more money to invest in Victory. As Lem says: "We asked for plenty of action-and we're sure getting it. All over the world our In their attacks on Australia r India, Hawaii and the AleutiansI the Japs were trying the sam, circle-breaking strategy It has failed at all points. Neither enemy apparently has the strength to attempt further break-outs. Both are occupied now with the effort to hold the present circles, with- out SUCceSS. country publishers who ever got It's easy to think that if the rich fighting the politician's battles, war is going well, we can afford The primary election held on~l to let down just a little instead June 24th was an exciting affair ~ o' realizing that the bigger our and the rivalry among the various [ offensive gets the more our boys candidates seeking nomination ran] are going to need equipment high. J. A. Ferris defeated A. L.~ and munitions. Martin for the senatorial nomina-[ tion by 126 votes; C. F. Will of] No. 71 o/a Series tHt ~,t men have got them Axis fellas on the run. Let's Back the At- tack ~ith War Bonds" Copyright, 1943, Brewin~ Industry Fouadation i II ii iiiiiiiii II The time to begin cutting into the circles is almost here Amer- ica and Britain can accomplish this in Europe by invading from the Balkans and from Britain, lopping off a large arc of the Hitler orb and pressing him back toward his starting point. In the Pacific there are many possibili- ties of severing large chunks of the irregular circle within whichI the Japs are entrenched. FurtherI Allied offensive operations there will have that aim. LANE IN BEACH i .---.---A June 5, 1908 The Beach postoffice was desig- nated as third class. Elmer E. Dickinson had been elected as school director to sUc- ceed Thomas Dunlap. M. A. Finneman was a candidate for clerk of the Lone Tree school district. Mr. Finneman had had three years of teaching experience. The city fathers were about to grant a franchise to the N. D. Independent Telephone Co., and in return the company promises to Install a local telephone exchange in Beach. At a basket social given by the ladies aid of the Norwegian church, baskets sold as high as $5.00. A musical program was given as part of the social evening, which netted the nice sum of $90 for the upkeep of the Beach church. Twenty-six sections of land known as the Stewart property and located southwest of Beach, also the building and property on main street situated next to ~he Lovell harware store, had been sold to a Wisconsin land company. The Fourth of July committee reported that $1,000 was available for the coming celebration. Colonel Plummer was going to deliver the oration of the day ~and the Hebron Concert Band had been hired to furnish patriotic music throughout the celebration. With a valuation of almost $300,000 it was estimated that a new school house can be erected in Beach. The question of a suit- able location seems to have been a problem but was eventually set- tled properly as the first grade school building was built within the city of Beach. The Standard Oil Company were making plans to build an oil sta- tion in Beach and use this point as a distributing center for all of the neighboring towns. At pres- ent-the standard t~tlk station is closed in Beach, althbugh it serves the territory from its Sentinel Butte ~attle~ t THIS NEWSPAPEB (g YKAR) and SIX GREAT MAGAZINES OR s4oo NEWSPAPER and MAGAZINES ~ROUP ~.-,Select Two [] Better I-Iome~ & Gar~.l Yr. [] Woman's Home Comp~...l Yr. [] American Home .............. 1 Yr. [] Click .................................... ! Yr. [] Official Detective Storiell Yr. ['3 American Girl ................... I Yr. [] Open Road (12 Isa,)_.14 Mo. 1"3 Pathfinder (weekly) ....... 1 Y~ O Screenland .................. 1 Yr. [] Silver Screen .........I Yr. [:] Spart~ Afield ....... IYr, i QROUP Ig,,,,,$d~a T~vo 1"3 ]Fact Digest ......... 1 Yr. [] lqower Grower .... .6 Mo. f'] Modern Romances ~_I Yr. 17 Modea-n Screen .. ....... 1 Yr. f3 ~hri~tima Herald .... .6 Mo. DOutdoor~ (12 I~) ~_.14 Mo. ~] Fareat~ Magaflae .~.J~ Mo. Jdeace & Di~overy ..... IYr. ~U]The Woman ................... 1 Yr. @ROUP C---$d~ct T~vo [] American Fruit Grower..l Yr. [] American Poultry Jrul..._l Yr. [2 farm Journal & Farmer's Wife .............. I Yr. [] Household Magaxine .... 8 Mo. [] Nat. Livestock ~rodu~r..l Yr. 17 Poultry Tribune ............. I Yr. [~ Mother's Home Life ........ 1 Yr. [] Cappex's ~armer ........ I Yr. [] Suo:e~ul Fatmlng ...... I Yr. MONEY: Enjoy the finest mc~c~ues while savi~ ~e~ mad qms. Only th~ouqh this new,a- paper can 'you qet such biq read.tuq barqalns. Pick your fcrvoritee and mail coupon to us TODAY. iiiii i i ii i THIS NEWSPAPER (It YEAR) and SIX GREAT MAGAZINES FOR BOTH s350 NEWSPAPER and MAGAZINES GROUP lb-.Selct Thr~ [:}True Story .................. 1 Yr, OFa~t Dige~ .............. IYr. [] Flower Grower ............. .6 Mo. I-1 Modem R~ ~...IYr. D Modem Screen ............ I Yr. [] Outdoo~ (12 I~) ........ 14 Me, 1-1 Christian Herald ............ 6 Mo. [3 Parents' Mafputne .......... 6 Me. [] Pa~ (weekly) ...... 26Im. f'3 Science & Discovery .......... 1 Yr. [] The Woman ................... LYr. GROUP B.--5*lect Three [] American Fruit Grower..I Yr. American Poultry Jrul,...l Yr. Far~ Journal & Ya~er's Wife .............. 1 Yr. ]7 Household Magazine .... 8 Mo. "[] Nat. Livestock Producer.l Yr. [] Poultry Tribune .............. 1 Yr. [] Mother's Home Life. ....... 1 Yr. ~Capper's Farmer .............. 1 Yr. Su~ul Farming ......... 1 Yr. COUPON I Tins HEWSPAPER ANY MAGAZINE LISTED ,OR PRICE SHOWN All M~ga~s ,4r For I ~r [] Ameri~m ]Fruit Grower.,$2.25 [] American Girl ............ 2,75 [] American Home ............ 2.75 [] American Magazine ........ $.25 [] American Mercury ........8.fi0 [] Ameriam Poultry Jrul ..... 2.15 [] Better Cook'g & Hom'k'g ~.60 [] Better Homes & Gardem 2.75 [-J Capper% Farmer .......... 2.25 [-j Child Life ..................... 8.25 Christian Herald ...... $,00 [] c~ck ............................. ~.~0 [] Column $3,,5 [-I C'try Gendeman (2 Yrs.) 2.50 1"3 Fact Digest ....................... 2.50 [7 Farm Jml. & F~-m's Wife 2.15 [:3 Elow~ Grower ............S,00 [-1 Homeheld 2.4O [3 Hmeta .............. s.2~ [] LmerW (wt~ly) ........ .._ 4.1o 1"3 Leek (evet~ omer week). $3~ [] Modern Romam~ .......... ~.50 0 Modem Serem ............... 2.50 i"1 Nature (lO l~ 12 moO. 3,fi0 00lclal Detective StorleL 8~)0 [~open Road ( 121~, 14 rod.,) 2.75 Outdoor~ (12 ira., 14 mud 2.50 0 pareav-' Magazine ....... S.O0 [~ Pathfinder (weekly) ....2.76 [] Popular Mechani~ .... $,75 [] Poultry Tribune .......... 2.15 [] Redbook Maga~ae ...... 8.25 0 ~:reeuland ................. 2.75 [] Silver Screen .... ; .............. 2.75 O$ci~ce & Dhcovery ........ 2.50 B Spogta Afield .................. 2,7~ Successful Farming ...... 2.25 [] True Story ..................... 2.50 [] The Woman .................. 2.~0 [] Woman's Home Comp,., 2,75 [] Your Life .................... 3.fi0 I FILL IN AND MAlL TO THIS NEWSPAPER TODAY