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Newspaper Archive of
Golden Valley News
Beach, North Dakota
July 19, 1934     Golden Valley News
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July 19, 1934
 
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PAGE SIX --J THE BEACH. N. D.. ADVANCE THURSDAY, JULY 19. It iM~syncrasy rs Found to Affect Many Adults I Idiosyncrasy among human be- Inca is not merely an occasional t ph~nomenon. Statlstleally, 90 per cent of all adults are susceptlMe to reaction of more or less moment ~hen brought into contact with memo reagent, according to Hygeia, the Health Magazine. While the mechanism of idiosyn- crasy is not understood, It is quite definite that two types exist, The :first type is to be looked on as a disease in which the inherited phys. :lca] make-up of the Individual is such that he may readily acquire a peculiar senaiflvlty toward certain , substances, generally those of a pro- tein nature. Thls type gives rise to such familiar symptoms as hay !fever and asthma. The victim of the second type of Idiosyncrasy displays a profound sensitivity when br(~ught into con- tact with certain dj'ugs and other ~chemical reagents not necessarily of the protein nature. Fortunately the manifestations are often con- fined to the skin and give rise to a rash or to an eczema as, for exam- ple, in the case of poison ivy. While the tendency toward the conditions manifested in the first of idiosyncrasy is inheritable, the second type has nothing to ~o with Inheritance. Shellfish, printer's ink, furs, , feathers, flowers, tobacco smoke, "horn" rimmed glasses, perfumee and telephone eavpieces are all ca- pable of cresting idiosyncrasy in certain perseus, according to exam- I)1(I) given. o Artemue Ward, Humorist, l~a|ght of Broad Highway Artemus Ward, the humorist, was Che assumed name of Charles Browne, born In Waterford, Maine, In 1884. How he came to adopt the pen-name is unknown. There was an Artemns Ward, a patriot of the Revolution, a legislator, Judge and ~he "first commander In chief" of the Continental army, whose odd 'name Browne might have found In .the pages of his school histories. Anyway, notes a writer in the Kan- sas City Star, it was a name that struck his eccentric fancy and it was the name under which, in his day, he made fame at home and abroad. Like Hamlet's Yorick, he was a natural--a born Jester--a clown who refused to take life seri- ously an~ who lived his life as he fended It. r Browne had little schooling, ex- cept the training that came to him ~as a printer's devil. It was the day -of the tramp printer nnd the print- er'$ wanderlust struck Browne aa ~ooon as he found the Journeyman's ; "stick" In his pocket--the badge of ").a craftmnan's freedom. For several years he wandered from one newR- )paper office to another, as far wear , as the Ml~t~lppl, toting a carpet ::mek, footing it for the most part, "~tteh-hlking" when he could solicit ,;m ride--a tall gawky youth, with ,1tallow-colored hair, pallid festuree land a "f~nny" no~ .... Or|gln of Shintoism The origin of Shintoism, the old- est and the basic religion of Japan, fls unknown. Its traditions and legends are sald to show a Chinese "Influence. Shintoism rose In pre- historic times and existed until after the beginning of our era without name, dogmas or writings. r~here was room in this primitive r~ liglon for the worship of whatever aroused the admiration or awe~ About the Sixth century A, D. l( entered a new period, with definite . forms and organization. Then, upon the introduction of. Buddhism into Japan it eomblned with and was to a large extent superseded by that !religion. But shintoism has un. dergone a very successful revival In comparatively recent times, with the development of Japanese pa. trloti~a and national pride. Habits o~ tim Cuckoo After she has laid her eggm the female cuckoo watches carefully. and If they are destroyed she finds other nests and lays a second clutch. She is not entirely forget. ful about the youngsters. When they arrive ~n the various nests, the ~rst thing they do is to eject all Boston Innkeeper Ordered to Deliver Mall in 1639 Until 1639 there is no trace of a postal system in America. In tile winter of that year one Richard Fairbanks, innkeeper of Boston, was ordered hy the general court to keep his house open for all let- ters "brought from beyond the seas, or . , . to be sent thither." The colonists were not compelled to leave their letters with him, but he was under obligation to deliver them "according to their dlrec- tions." This action, as far as ('an be dis- covered, was the first effort on the continent to provide a post ollice During the colonial period post riders and shops were the most common means of mail transporta- tion. The stage coach was not In. trodueed regularly until 1785, Five years thereafter fhere were only 20 ! Popular Carnation Known Before Sixteenth Century The early history of the carna-. t-lon is, unhappily, Involved in ob- scurity, the earliest record of the plant ~ating no further back than the beginning of the Sixteenth cen- tury, when Bishop Douglass men- tions it among other garden flow- era, notes a correspondent in the (;olte,~ v~ t, y. ,~ ~)P""~" Kansas City Star. It ls safe to as- ~:,>o A. M. July :]. 19:~4. ~t~e H,)a)'d 1. I. ~ . Hlec~i~m cx- of (JOUt~t[y ( "l)nl :ll iS ~1011C l'.~ Inet ill ~1 }'. Lov; I'e.'l l~|t.'t i,) sume the carnation was~ cultiva- regular qu,tr~erly ~:eetine, wi~ti :til expolts,, tlon much earlier than we are able members pr,,s(,nL Ed Summers. h:lection ex- to trace by any written record, and The minv, te~ ~f til,, preee(.din~ t)~,iln~ quar[,,,r were t')~ztt| arid ttl)l)love(l. ('. ( ) [t tlVO ",,,;) I t~lcetio]l not l~mprobably it was no uncom- .~ c~,nln itle,, from th~ [5m(,rue!~e~. expense men plant. Turner's remark in Relief met ~with the ('ounty Board I). .l VCi~-k~. ].:lection t'x- /'cga rdiag the appointing of bays pe)l ~,' "LLbellus,'" where he calls It Incar- f,,r the Civilian t'onservarim~ Corp. ~,Vm. iIizlin. Election ex- nation, favors that supposition. The following names were sut~nit- ij*/i.~(, . . t~,d: Arti~ur Holland. leslie Hu~'t~es, V/ ,i. Hurn~_ Election ex- Recorded in "tlakluyt," written in Bradley "Pillotson. John Moran. Har- p(m~. 15~, tile word referring to the ~dd ~,VtHlaker. R~ymond ~,Vieka. re- C. it. \'a:~ Eat,n. I.~le~li,m lix ~Vieka. Ray Gasho Glen Metc.alf. eXl)en~e . ........... plant occurs as if in common use. [_'leDlen('o dohnsoo. Robert IIane- A. 1Q ~Voscpka, Eh,cii )n e:.:- It was not until Gerard pll~iished volS. tIarold~Feldhusen, Edwin An- t,ense . .................. derson. Nell ~ennedy, Clifford .len Paul ~A',~fner Election ex his "Herbal" In 1597 that the el- d,-,). LawrenPce Maus. Heinhari Ni~t- Fense tent to which the carnation was Ier. Donald tIarnmond Florian Ni~t- Lewis Zie!isdort'. t']le, lion q.00 c.01) .,00 4 ,)0 4.00 ,t.00 ~.00 .I .00 mall contraots (corre,.-~I)onding to 1 cultivated and tile great number ler. l),mgias stevens Eugene Hell- exl)enue ~, .... nlan. ~y Itgreenleat between tilt" Erlte~t Zio]~RIO "f t']h,ctb)n of varieties that were at the time c'eunry ~cald slid the Relief commit- cxI)eU.~ .... the number of stage coach routes) I grown in gardens, can be gauged order lisied: 1, l)ougl'~s Stevens, 2. pens~ .~, ........ In existence , ' tee. tl{e folloxxtng were chosen in the, B. R. t~erts,~ lCh,ctim) e.x- The greatest difficulty was with]fully, Lawrence ),l~t,as. 3. Clifford .l,,ndro. H. !]~ ~l~.lbi'd,, l'~lecli,:)n )4. Nell K~nnod.v 5. Robert Hans- eXl)e~nset ..... the slowness and un('erlainty of the It then suddenly bursts upon our void, 6. John Moran. Alternates: 1. ~,V. T. l)u~udgan Election mails. Carriers not only made out ken a fully developed flower, al- Harold IVi~itaker. 2. (lien ,Mcten~e ~ ........... . -[.~):~ their own schedules hilt set them ready divided into sections, the z ('lemcnce Johnson. A. J [Iow~e. Electim~ e.~ John L. B~trkland bought from tim pen~ ................ S.Oa aside at their own pleasure. If the plants differing from each other in count,- on contract: I,ots IO. ll and Fred~ \Vassqmn~, t,~le('~:i 12, Bl'ock 2, Hunter's Third Addi- aS'pease -4" ....... / .I.0' day on which mail,~'as to leave or I ~he habitat of growth and cultural tion to the City of Beach. }l~M~," ~la)'n~o~, ~leetl~ ex- arrive was known it was considered requirements, but alike In the re,- An agreement was made witl1 ~%[rs, ;~/pease ... i*-.~:-':~ ... ~ ........ 4.00 sufllclently definite. ] markable range of colors embraced Louise Benson by which ~he Is t'~*Glenn Alls~'~, .~lef~on ex- board and room Carl Sel~erle a,rtd pense~ ...~.'~.~..f.~??.~-- 4.0, Up to 1672 there apparently was! by each. It was said varieties were A. L. CunninghauL Victor ~lel~~lecti(m " ~ An agreemeut~ was ent(~'ed iuto expense ........ Jr ....... 4.00 no arrangement for the transmis- Introduced from various countrie~ with A. G. Jack~or~ hy wh|ch he is ~Vm. ~wan, l~eetion ex- ston and delivery of domestic let- but Gerard'sdeclaratlon that"every to fuz'nisl~ the ~ne~e~sary ~raterlat l)ease~.. ...... ~ ............... b.O0 tar& In December of that year clymate and countrey brlngeth forth for installing witty" in the' county i Arlhut.$.~it~ Election ex- house on Lot 17,~!~k 13, Hunter's ~ I~ensb..~c..~ ....................... 4.00 there was an effort to start a new sortes" is no doubt more con-s~;coad Add. to~, th~ C~ of Beacl'l. ted." G. S~ct]~rman, Election monthly I)ost between New York slstent wtth fact, Price $60.00 / ~ ~ ~ ] egpensea~. ............................. 4.00 The followfitg~i~A~ere audited, I Le~s~- Dl~,'niak, Election and Bosl,)n, originating with Fran- iapi)roved~nd obd~r=~paid subject I ex~ens~ ......................... 4.00 to persm)~l property t~xes dt~. or ]~,V.~. Carew, Election ex- CIS 1.ovelace, governor of New Emerald Said to Promote , deltnqueJ[t: ~ }i ~ } pe~tse .......................... 4.00 York. S A. ~. rStoddard~' d Ju~ise ~ Gee ~'right, Electlou ex- Friendahip, Conquer in) Fees .......................... ~_...% l~a0 ] pete ................................... S.00 ~, Mike Th)isen. Mlxing- ~h0p- ' I Math Brown. Election ex- The emerald is regarded as au per pof~on --.;- ......................= 3~/}0I pense .................................... 4.00 W~ala and Ba~king Shark [ emblem of success In love. Its M,.~. Fred~StacKer, Care ot " V~'m. Gordon, Election ex- E. Yat~'~ ................................ I0.00 pense .................... ~;.-...:: ..... 4.00 Reach an Enormous Size)~ green color 18 said to promote Anna Vlas~aff, Care Pete i l~ertha Brown, ~tecuon The average person looks upon friendsMp and constancy of mind,[ Conk ........ ~ ............. .~. ......... 4.00) expense ................................ 4.00 G. H. Vg.~@~mann, uperat- ~-~. Julia F. Cook, Election ex- the ~hark as the greatest terror of while other authorities attribute to ! ing cou~ity tractor .......... 8z.~a ~ pease ............................... 4,00 the meat, mad for ages the belief In It the me~ming of immortality and ]Tractor & Equip. Co., .Re- ]L. H. CaIIender, Election pairs co~Uty trqetor ....... 26X71 expense .......................... ~.00 them as man-eaters has been hand- conquering of sin, writes an author- Ed. Nlstler, dragging roads 11.80 [J. R. Andre. Election ex- ed down from generation to ben- tty In the Kansas City Star. Floyd Bosserman, dragging ~ I)ense ................................. 4.00 I roads . .................................... 7.20 J. A. Vinquist, Election ex- eration, says a writer in Tit-Bits Even In the days of Pltay thls c G. Johnson. Operating pease ............................ : 4.00 48.00 CIell TroIlope, Election ex- Maga~ne. The two largest specles, the whale shark and the basking shark, both of which gr~w to an enormous size, are certainly lazy, slow, inoffensive, and practically harmless. How- ever, the great white shark of trop- ical seas is considered to be a man- eater, and other closely related species are looked upon as very dangerous. Another fish, the barracuda, smaller than the average shark, is regarded by many as far more vi- cious, and dangerous. It seldom at- tains a length greater than 8 feet, but is described as 'bloodthirsty, bold, Inquisitive, and of an Implac- able temper." The barracuda Is a large, plke-shaped, predatory, and extremely voracious fish, allied to stone was highly esteemed; he D. M. l~owie. Operating wrote of emeralds: "Neither dlm coun~ tractor ................... nor shade, ~ yet the light ~f a win. Marquette. Road work T. 13~. R. 103 .............. candle, cause~ them to Iose 2heir Louise I-g~nson, care John luster." G re gory ............................ [ L. J. Eriekson. Bo~rd pri- The fresh color of emerald was soners ................................ supposed to be good for the eyes ()h~f Thorsol~ Operating county grader .................... " (bearing out modern optical opin- I,~'i,or Nordby, Expense poor ion on the restful qualities of relief ............................... i green). Pllny says. "There IS nst Paul ~Wagner, Freight and [ d:'ay hopper bait ................ a gem or precious stone that so, A C. Morley. ~i'xing hop- county grader .................... pease ............................ 4.00 48.00 Lloyd Catlender, Election expense ........................ 400 4.20 J. A. McDanold. Election expense ................. ~ ........... 6.00 7.00 1~. J. McDanold. ~|e~tion expense ............... ::~o ~ ........ 6.00 4.00 E. C.. Dolled, EIeC~:ion ex- pense .................................. 4.0~ 82.751.25E.( Livermore. EleetionEleetin ~;~0~04. 50.54 arthel. Election ex- ' 9.00 fully possesseth the eye, and yet] ~ o~,',P'>i~.ml~le ......... i~r .......... l ) y L . never contenteth it with antlety, l Culverts ..................... /' a l J Hess M~:~ing 1 N y, if the sight hath been wearie~[. )o;so~ :" " ~i t " " ...................... "- and dimmed by In entire poringl Dick Kennedy, M:lxinff | upon anything else. the beholding! ~pe~. poison ""~i:~;~"~ of th s stone do h refresh and re- per poison ................. store it a~ain" ' Corbett Howard, Gas "" = " per mixing The finest emeralds In the rich j. E. Metcalt velvet and grau green color come l_.tr?l =- Fls- e /tlt[orU . ne , from the South American rolmbllc) floor hopp( The Useful Swallow There are seven common species of swallows found in the United States, four of which have aban- doned to some extent their primi- tive nesting habits and have at- tached themselves to the abodes of man, according to the Bureau of Bi- ological Survey. The barn swallow builds extensively under . roofs, mostly In barns and under bridges, having abandoned entirely its for- mer home under cliffs and over- hanging rocks. Tho cliff swallow1 has also abandoned its nesting site I in cliffs and taken up Its abode un- der the eaves of barns, while the martin prefers a more modern home provided for It by farmers and farm ehildron In back yards and around tim farmstead" The diet of these bh, d~ I~ composed exclusively of in- sects. Their food is taken exclu- slvely while on the wing, where they skim from the air or from the tops of Call gra~ and weeds ~mch fly- ing Insects as files, beetles, flyl~ ants, gnats and many other Insects. Canada's Great Lak~ In popular usage the term "Great Lakes" refers to those vast bodies of fresh water, Lakes Superior, Hu- ron, Erie, Ontario and Michigan. There is no other such chain. But the other occupants. It Is a won- derful struggle to see. with the yoking cuckoo ahvays the victor, and when each nest contains one on this continent there are other hungry youngster, the real mothe~ lakes greater than some of these. watches over them, although she Great Bear lake, for Instance, In ~ever attempts to give them food, the Canadian Northwest territory, Incubation of the eggs, and th0 Is larger than Erie by 1,720 square feeding of the young, ls left to ths miles and larger than Ontario by foster parents. Soon after ths 4,120 square miles. Great Slave ~oung appear, the cuckoo and her lake is nearly the size of Great mate fly south to their African Ilome. . 7.00 i Sc~!t~'ne! Eu; Al)l)lica r i,)n~ for cancellation o'f ~)~ t:lXe~ bv tile C'OtlHty Treasurer were [filed for Sec, ::-'ta-103 and Lot,~ :;- -0'~ 4-5-(; Bloek 5. Hunr~r'.~ 5tb Add. ',, [~ea~-il. W('I'~" al)I)Fovt~(] t)y [|le ~,:trd 00 Sllbj~'t'r tO *]l~" l~l)i)l'~,va] '~f lilt" St:t;(' lTax ('Otll)!/issiol~el'. Cancellation was asked on I}10 ~'i'O'Ji~d [hal ~!lese tit~- r. Election ex- pense ................................ 4.00 Roy McCaskey, Election expense ................................ 8.00 J. S. ~llauer. Election ex- pense ................................. 4.00 August Feldman, Election pease .................................... ~ 4.00 Anna McCaskey, Election expense ................................ 4.00 A. F. Doblar, Election ex- pense .................................... 4.00 Veto. Marquette, Election expense ................................ 11,00 ' E. J. Hess. Election ex- Pense ..................................... 4.00 E. H OIstad, Eleclion ex- pense ................ '4.00 Sidney Connell. Election 75.00 expense ................................ 4.00 9.50 Bessie Olstad. El~ct~,,n ex- ~ 3.60 pease .................. 4.00 C. F. PoIley, Eiectio,a ,x- pease ................................... 8.00 I?. C. Doyle. ~:leetion ,~x- pease ..................... 4.00 A. E. Ramsey, Election ex- pense ......................... 4.00 E. D. NelSon. Election. ex- pense ......................... 4.00 Arthur Undorwo~)d. Elec- tion expense ...................... 4.00 Fred C Robertson. Election expense ....... , ........................ 8.00 O. W Youells, Election ex- pense ............................... 4.00 , Ed. Carney, Election ex- 8.90 I pease .................................... 4.00 Dewey Stecker) Election 5,48 expense .............................. 4.00 J. E. Houck, Election ex- pense .................................... 4.00 "~L H. ~;oodhull. Election expense .............................. 10.00 A. J. Glhnan Election ex- pense .................................. 6.00 Z. Vlasoff, Election ex- pense .................................... 6.00 K. H. Alton, Election ex- pense ................................. 6.00 Wm, Meyer, Election ex- 6.00 pense Herman W:"Brow'~-, ~i~;8}ion expense ................................ 8.00 J. M. Steeker, Election ex- pense .................................... 4.00 Mrs. Mantella Butterfleld, Election expense ................ 4.00 Chas. Lingk, Election ex- ponse .................................. John Zeller, ElecUon ex- pense .:. ................................. J. c. Ftonnold. 'Electlon ex- pense .................................. J. L Honnold. Election ex- pense ................................. M. C. Tescher, Election ex- pease ........... Anton Lardy,-I~l'eet{o'~{"ex-: p(?nse ....................... Pi]ltlip Lardy, Election ex- pense - ............................. Saul L. .~,Ioore. Election ex- pense .................................... John Htadick. Election ex- pense .................... Alice ~lool'e. Election ex- pense .............. Julia Kalkman. Election ex- i)ense ................................ Andrew Carlson. Refund on lots rented ....................... Northwestern Bell Tel. Co.. Phone service .................... Ralph Mosser. Election ex- pense ................................... County Treasurer. Postage, Freight, etc ......................... 377.24 W. A. Gerrish, Insanity hearing ................................ 10.00 Curtis Sit1. Mileage ................ 65.60 The following claims on election expenses were rejected by the Board for the reason that the Law does not make any provisions for p~y- meat of such claims: Chas. Llngk, $2.00; E. A. Llvermore, $2.00; for posting notices of election; Fred C. Roberteon. postage, 25c. A contract for deed was issued to Martha A. Kirkpatrick to Sac. 3, T. 140, R, 103. 5:00 P. M. the Board adjourned to meet at 9:00 A.M. July 6, 1934. ~5.p0 iotas. H. C. Knutsen. A. D. MacKin , non and Harris Robinson. =~.00 5:00 P. M. the Board adjourned ~o meet at 9:00 A. M. July 7, 1934. 5.00 5.00 9:00 A. M. July 7. 1934, the Board 8.00 of County Commissioners met p?ar- suant to adjournment with all mere- 4 00 berg present. " ] The County ~oard organized as a 4.00 Board of Equalization to equalize assessments between the d|fferent 4.00 taxing districts of the County. and changes were made as follows: The A. L. Martin Elevator at hama was raied from $1000.00 tu $1200.00. an mcrease of 20 percent. The Powers Elevator Company at Chums was raised from $3500.S0 to $4200.00, an increase of 20 percent. The Occident Elevator Co. at Thel- en was raised from $4500.00 to $5- 400.00, an increase of 20 percent. The Farmers" Elevator Co. at Sentinel Butte, two elevators, from $7500.00 to $8250.00, an increase of l0 per- cent. The Cargill Elevatorat Sen- tinel Butte. from $3500.00 to ~'~- 850.00, an increase of 10 percent. The Occident Elevator Co. at Golva. from $5500.00 to $6050.00, an increase of 10 percent. The Standard Oil Co. Improvements, at Golva. from ~l- r. .)4S.00 to $2012.00 an increase of ;~(I percent. The Standard Oil Co. im- provements, at Sentinel Butte. from $1575.00 to $?520.00. an increase or 60 percent. H, H, Burchette, Trot- ters oil station equipment reduced from $700,00 to $350.00. a reduct on of 50 percent. Ed. Fischer Golva, filling station equipment, from $50.00 ",) $t00.00. an iocrease of 100 percem. ,L R. Larsen, Golva. F'ill- ing station equipment, from $50,00 to $100.00. an Increase of 100 per- sent. Standard Oil Co.. Golva, fill- ing station equipment, from $5000 to $100.00, an Increas~ of 100 per- cent. ! The follow, ng bills were audited, approved and "ordered paid subject ro personal property taxes due or delinquent: Mary Bailey Nursing of Chaffin ' Hanson Ll)i::'& " HaweCo.:$ 57.00 Roofing ................... 10.75 Ed. Summers, C.rll at"di n'ff Chaffin ....................... 21.00 Harvey Easton, Account Hopper control .................... 2.55 Gee. Wosepka, First Aid Kit ....................................... 1.00 5:00 P. M. the Board adjourned to meet at 9:00 A. M. July 9, 1934. 9:00 A. M. July 9, 19~4, the Board of County Commissioners met pur- suant to adjournment with all mea- d.00 bers present. ' The Board or~;anized as a Board 4.00 of Equalization to equalize asses. meats hetween the different taxing 8.00 districts of the County. Following are the changes lnade by percent 4.00 increase or decrease: TWP. 143. RANGE 103 4.00 Item 1. Division D, decrease 25 percent; Division E. decrease 10 per- 4.00 cent. item "2. Y)ivislon A. decrease 11 4.00 percent. , TV~'P. 144. t~ANGE I03 4.00 Item 1, Division D. decrease 20 percent; Division E, decrease 10 per- 4.00 cent Item_.') Division A. decrease 11 4.00 percent; Division C, decrease 37 per- cent. 4.00 Item 3, Increase 14 percent. PEARL TO~TNSHIP 1.00 Item 1. Division A. decrease 38 percent; Division B, decrease 17 per- 39.16 cent; Division C, decrease 6 per- cent; Division D, decrease 25 per- 1100 cent: Division E, decrease 10 per- cent. Item 2, Division A, increase 7 per- cent: Division C, decrease 15 per- cent: Division D. increase 25 per- cent. Item 3, Increase 35 percent. HENRY TO~VNSHIP Item 1 Division C. lficrease 13 percent: Division D, decrease 11 per- cent: Division E, decrease 36 per- can t. Item 2. Division A, Increase 7 per- cent: Division ~. Increase 20 per- cent; Division D, increase 18 per- cent: Division E, increase 58 per- cent; Division G, increase 20 percent. Item 3, Increase 26 percent. Item 6. Division A, decrease 40 percent; Division C, increase 30 per- cent. ELMWOOD TOWNSHIP Item 1, Division B, increase 4 per- cent; Division C. lnccease 4 percent; Division D, decrease 7 n,~rcent' DI- vlshm I~ increase 20 pet~e~t. ' Item ~, Division A, aecrcase 15 percent: Division C. increase 18 per- cent; Division D. increase 43 per- cent; Division E, increase 22 per= cent; Dfvislon F, decrease 16 Per- cent; DivhaionG, tncx~ea~e 19 per- 9:00 A, M. July 6. 1934, the Board of County Commissioners met pur- suant to adjournment with all mem- bers present. Mrs. Foster and Mrs. Peall ap- peared before the Board regarding the taxes on Lot 7. Block 31 Orig- inal Townslte of Beach. Henry Lehman appeared before the Board relative to tax matters in cent Item 3. Increase 43 percent. Item 6, Division C, inerease percent. ELK CREEK TOVCNSPIIP ltem 1. Division B. decrease percent; Division D. percent; Division E, decrease 10 cent. item 2. Division A, percent: Division E. increase percent: Division F, decrease 7 cent; Division. G, increase 50 cent. ltenl 3 Incre'tse o6 r~ercent Item 6, DIvision A, increase i percent DIVIDE TO~,VNSHI P Item l, Division D. increase 9 cent: Division~,E, increase 65 C~llt. Item % Division A. Increase cent; Division G. increase 45 cent. Item 3. Increase 22 percent WANAGAN TOWNSHIP Item 1. Division C, increas( percent; t~iv~io!~ l), decrease 9 cent. Division E. :nerease 2 cent, Item 2, Division A, increase 6 cezrt: Division i~. increase 43 con!: Division E increase 65 cent: Divi.~ion F. (lecrease 3 Division G. increase 33 per-_>nt, Itch/ 3, Increase 1 perc~..t. Item 6, Division A. percent; I)iviMon t" in,'re,.,,~ percent. I)ELHI T()~.V NSHY P Item 1. DiviMon IL deel'eas( percent ; D~h,'lsion D. /l:~-r percent; I.)ivisio~: t'~. lIicue: :~ 6 cent. Item ". DiviMoc A. percent; I)ivi~it)ll (~'. lllCl'Ci~.se 14 cent: Division E. increase 66 cent: Division G. increase 31 cent. Item 3. Decrease 11 pe='cent. Item 6. Division A_. increase percent ; Division C, increase percent. SADDLE B~TTE TOWN ltem I, Division A, percent; Division B, decrease 6 I cent; Division C, decrease 8 per( Division D decrease 9 percent; vision E, increase 13 percent; Item 2, Division A, decrea percent; Division C, increase 3 cent; Division E, increase 41 cent; Division F decrease 15 cent; Division G. "decrease 8 pet Item 6, Division A. percent; Division C. decrease cent. I=~EACH TOVeNSHIP Item 1. Division A. decrease 4 cent; Division B. decrease 13 cent; Division C, decree: Division D. decrease 11 vision E. increase 11 percent; Item 2, Diviaion A, percent; Division B. decrease cent; Division C, increase 27 I cent; Division D, increase 48 cent: Division E, increase 115 l cent; Dlvisiou F, decrease 2 Division G, increase 3S Item 3. decrease 12 percent. Item 6, Division A, percent; Division C. Increase cent. CITY OF BEACH Item 1, Division D, decrea~ percent: Division E,. increase 80 I cent. Item 2, Division A, increase ~1 ce~rt; Division E, increase 150 I cent: Division F, increase 50 cent. Item 0, Division A. increase percent. VILLAGE OF SENTINEL Item I, Division C, percent; Division D, increase cent; Division E, decrease 55 cent. Item 2. Division A, percent; Division C. increase cent; Division E, increase cent; Division F, decrease I cent, SENTINEL TOWNSHIP Item 1. Division D. percent; Dlvislon E, decrease ceut. Item 2. Division A, increase cent; Division ~ decrease 4r cent; Division F, decrease 313 cent; Division O. increase cent. Item 6, Division A, percent LONE TREE Item 1, Division B0 cent; Division C, decrease cent; Dizision D, increase cent; Division E, decrease cent. Item 2, Division A, cent; Division ~, Increase cent; Division C, Inca-ease cent; Division D, increase cent: Division E, increase cent; Division F, increase 6 Division G, Increase 35 Item 3. Decrease 5 Item 6, Division t cent: Division C, cent. GARNER TOWNSHIP Item 1. Division B, percent: Division C. cent; Division D. decrease cent; Dtvlsion E, Increase cent. Item 2, Division cent: Division D, cent: Division F, cent; Division G. cent Item 6, Divlsio percent: Division cent BULLION Item 1. Division B, cent; Division D decrease Division E, decrease 2 Item 2, DiVision A, cent; Division E, lacrosse cent; Divtsi'on F, Increase cent; Division G. increase cent Item 6, Division percent; Division C, cent. TWP. 136. RANGE Item 1, Division A. Percent; Division percent; Division D. cent: Division E, cent. Item 2, Division percent; Division cent; Division D. Division E, increase 8 vision F, decrease 26 vision G, decrease 5 I Item 3, Decrease Item 6, Division percent; Division C, cent. TWP. 136, RANG Item 1. Division A, percent; Division B. cent; Division D, cent; Division E, cent. Item 2, Division percent; Division cent: Division E, increase cent; Division F, cent: Division G, cent. Item 6, Division A, percent ; Division C. percent. TWP. 137, RANGi Item 1, Division percent; Division B percent; Dlvislon D, cent; Division E. cent. Item 2, Division percent; Division cent; Division cent. Item 6, Division percent, 'I 138 Item 1, vist percent; Division E, cent. Item 2. Division percent; Division F cent; Division G, cent. Item 3, Decrease 12 The Board of Journed until Jul time any matter equalizations of taken up. Upon petition AIvln appointed road R. 106. and hls proved. Upon application Ralph Moor were allowed to be done in ships in the District on Divide road. 5:00 P.M.